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adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
in the christian conservative community. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> we are still looking at a post-election survey that we commissioned, that we got this morning about 5:00 a.m., but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i have seen throughout my career. there is a tendency to caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and suggest that they live in trailer parks and are poor and uneducated and easy to command. they cling to their guns and religion and vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs to the exact same percentage the rest of the electorate. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the just and unjust alike. they are also struggling with their mortgages and figuring out how to put their kids through school. they voted to a large part on the economy and jobs. you look at issues like same-sex marriage and abortion, and it was about 10% of what drove. i think what you
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi attacks on libya? guest: i think there's a lot we don't know. this is one of those scandals that comes out in dribs and drabs. drip, leak, leak, leak. i think there is a sort of consensus that we want to know more. the american public wants to know more. certainly journalists do. there could be political fallout from it. this is a week where there's going to be a number of hearings on ben gaza. so both the house and senator intelligence committees were meeting. there is certainly, congressionally, the desire to hear more and hear more facts. there are big questions that are unanswered. both in the time frame of what happened in the attack, little bits of information, but also in terms of whether the u.s. was ill prepared or naive in terms of providing security for ambassador chris stevens. any tragedy where an ambassador dies and three other americans, there needs to be an investigation. host: will in tennessee, indepe
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
spending, we have to change our foreign policy and we have to reassess the whole entitlement system and they are not in the mood to do that because there are too many politically that say, you can't touch my program. touch somebody else's. that is the reason we are going to continue to do this and things will get worse until the crisis gets so bad we have a currency crisis, interest rates go up, we will have to revamp. that will not happen in january. it's all going to -- they are going to pass the buck. host: let's go to the phones and see what the viewers have to say. barb is from our democrats line. good morning. caller: i think all of the bush tax cuts should be eliminated and those dollars be applied to the deficit. for the areas under sequestering, i think they should eliminate the requirement that everything to be cut across the board and let the defense department to determine what they need and what they do not need. the same with the discretionary areas. guest: i agree with half of what you say. i think the military is a big problem. both sides really did not want to touch
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
in their programming ucla. our coverage begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern followed by a speech on foreign policy. this'll be his third time speaking since becoming prime minister. then later, be no rennae talks about social enterprise. -- bono talks about social and a price. host: we want to welcome the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele welcome back to c-span. what happened tuesday guest: i think from the democrats perspective they got an affirmation of the policies and the direction that the president articulated. as a i would say there wasn't much articulation there but they showed they are spoir in getting their vote to the table and with the pick up in the senate i think a lot of people kind of looked at the senate as one of those fire walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. and it really makes the policy discussion take on a very different hugh than it otherwise would. and i think for the republicans it was one of those come to jesus 340e789s politically where they have to reassess and evaluate whether they want to be a relevant p
part of the 20th century would bring us a major financial crisis and engulf us in a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. to achieve these goals i thought the government would have had to shrink in size and scope, reduce spending, change the monetary system, and reject the unsustainable cost of policing the world and expanding the american empire. the problems seemed to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my viewpoint, just following the constraints based on the federal government by the constitution would have been a good place to start. just how much did i accomplish? in more ways according to conventional viss wisdom my off and on career in congress from 1976 to 2012, accomplished very little. no named legislation, no named federal buildings or highways, thank goodness. in spite of my efforts the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive, and a prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues. wars are constant, and pursued without congressional declaration, deficits rise to the sky, poverty is ramp
-- statehood party in puerto rico. issueset's talk about and how they impacted voters. foreign policy, what were voters' attitudes about foreign policy issues? guest: the exit poll asked people what their most important issue was. the economy was way up on top, almost 3/5ths of people said the economy was the number-one issue. the percentage who said that foreign policy was the most important issue was down in the single digits. that is not the driver. foreign policy is usually not the biggest driver. it is worth noting that those voters who said that foreign policy was the most important issue, president obama won that group. host: that made for about 5%. the economy, 59% put that as the most important issue. federal budget deficit, 15%. talk about how the health care law played into voters' attitudes? 18% said it was the most important issue. guest: that is an important thing. almost one in five voters said that health care was the most important issue. the president won roughly three- quarters of that vote. throughout the republican primaries, the issue of obamacare was a huge rallying c
an article calling the other fiscal cliff as foreign policy. the shake up on the foreign relations committees -- three of the chair and a ranking member being gone but if senator kerry would move positions it would be a complete clean slate on how often set aside and wondering how it affects the president's ability to build up the top line foreign policy issues, like syria and iran, but also others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber duckie on the catalog today. it helps pay our salaries. >> i think bob corker will be interesting as ranking member on foreign relations. he skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations panel in both chamber
information with those of us who are supposed to make critical foreign-policy decisions in the budget process, very unwilling. this is another case of that. i was struck by this that you mean to tell me that the head of the cia uses gmail to committee approved it struck me that i was concerned about this. i see that coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify. everybody should testify and provide as much openness ans possible. >> some of your colleagues on the senate side are talking about making a deal working with democrats on a compromise. what do you make of those efforts, and how far are you willing to go to strike the immigration deal with the democrats? >> that is a good question, and i would have been surprised if i did not hear it. i have seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at the immigration issue, thinking they have the negotiation skills to resolve one of the most complicated and convoluted and far-reaching issues that i have seen in this congress. there is not a simple solution to this. each time there's a proposal that
have spoken on this floor about excessive government spending, it's time to look at the cost of foreign wars before we start cutting domestic programs that our very own people need and they need them to survive. it's just not progressives like me who believe we need a change in policy, mr. speaker. there is a clear consensus among the american people. they agree that this military occupation is bad for america, bad for afghanistan and bad for the cause of peace and stability around the world. i think it was pretty telling that during the recent campaign even the republican candidate for president ended up supporting a withdrawal of troops by 2014, but in my opinion that's not nearly soon enough. . now that the presidential campaign is over, we must accelerate the timetable and end this war as soon as it is possible and safe. every remaining day we have troops on the ground is another day that gives strength to the very, treatmentists we are trying to defeat. the time has come to invest in afghanistan the right way, with humanitarian and civilian support, rather than military force. it's
your head on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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